Mum warns why you shouldn’t kiss babies on the mouth after her daughter breaks out in cold sores

Why you should NEVER kiss babies or toddlers near the mouth: Little girl, two, suffers ‘horrendous’ 21-day infection that left her screaming in agony and refusing to eat or drink

  • A mum shared how her young daughter contracted ‘horrendous’ cold sores
  • Leah Green said her child got the HSV virus after being kissed by another adult
  • 21-month-old Sadie broke out in painful spots in and around her lips and mouth
  • Sadie became dehydrated and lost weight as she was too sore to eat or drink
  • Leah warned other parents not to let any one kiss their kids following the ordeal










An Australian mum has told of the horrible three-week long infection her toddler daughter caught after being kissed on the mouth by another adult.

Posting on Tiny Hearts Education, Leah Green told of how her 21-month-old daughter Sadie contracted a ‘horrendous’ herpes simplex mouth infection which causes painful cold sores.

‘Listen and learn from my first hand experience why you shouldn’t kiss babies/kids, especially if they aren’t yours,’ Leah wrote.

Leah Green told of how her 21-month-old daughter Sadie developed sore spots in and around her mouth

She has contracted herpes simplex mouth infection after an adult kissed her on the mouth

Leah Green told of how her 21-month-old daughter Sadie contracted a ‘horrendous’ herpes simplex mouth infection which causes painful cold sores after an adult kissed her on the mouth

The toddler was in so much pain she would 'scream in agony' and became dehydrated and lost weight as she was unable to eat or drink

The toddler was in so much pain she would ‘scream in agony’ and became dehydrated and lost weight as she was unable to eat or drink

The infection was passed on by an adult with Herpes Simplex Virus or HSV which affects around 80 per cent of adults and, when active, can cause small blister-like spots in or around the mouth that are contagious through skin contact for around two weeks.

After being kissed on the lips by an adult with an active cold sore, Sadie developed two small spots on her lip then spiked a temperature of 39C.

‘Within hours the spots were spreading across her face and white spots formed in her mouth, which turned into this awful puss like stuff that was especially behind her teeth,’ Leah said.

‘The slightest touch would make the spots bleed and she would scream in agony.’

Sadie developed two small spots on her lip and spiked a temperature of 39C

Within hours the spots were spreading across her face and white spots formed in her mouth

Sadie developed two small spots on her lip and spiked a temperature of 39C then within hours the spots were spreading across her face and white spots formed in her mouth

Leah said she took Sadie to the doctor who prescribed a cream for the spots and gave her 'around the clock' Panadol which helped but it was a 'waiting game' for the infection to clear up.

Leah said she took Sadie to the doctor who prescribed a cream for the spots and gave her ‘around the clock’ Panadol which helped but it was a ‘waiting game’ for the infection to clear up.

The toddler was in so much pain she couldn’t eat or drink which resulted in weight loss and dehydration.

‘She was absolutely miserable and stuck to my hip for four days straight! Just attempting to put her down made her scream,’ the mum recalled.

Leah said she took Sadie to the doctor who prescribed a cream for the spots and gave her ‘around the clock’ Panadol which helped but it was a ‘waiting game’ for the infection to clear up.

The first-time mum said it was ‘horrific’ to watch her child in so much pain and hoped her story will spread awareness.

‘Please please please DON’T kiss or let anyone kiss your babies,’ she said.

‘Doesn’t matter who they are or if you think they will be offended. Hurt their feelings and keep your babies safe!’

Herpes Simplex Mouth Infection: What you need to know

About Herpes Simplex Mouth Infection

When a child is infected with herpes simplex virus for the first time, it can cause herpes simplex mouth infection. This infection often leads to painful gums and ulcers inside a child’s mouth called gingivostomatitis

After a first infection with herpes simplex virus, the virus sleeps in the skin for life. It can wake up and cause cold sores when your immune system is under stress – for example, during a minor illness, hormonal changes or sunburn.

Herpes simplex virus is highly contagious and can spread even before blisters form.

If someone in your family has a herpes simplex mouth infection, other family members should avoid direct contact with any blisters. Also avoid sharing utensils, glasses or towels.

Symptoms

Sore mouth, lips, gums or throat

Swollen or red mouth

Small blisters or ulcers

Loss of thirst or appetite

Drooling

Irritability and crying

Treatment

The infection will usually start to clear up by itself within 3-4 days and disappear completely in 7-10 days without leaving any scarring although there are some ways to ease the pain.

You can give your child paracetamol in recommended doses or use topical pain preparations. These preparations include lignocaine gel 2% or lignocaine and chlorhexidine mouth wash (for older children who won’t swallow).

If the infection is severe or your child is at risk of a severe infection, your doctor might suggest an anti-viral medication.

You should encourage your child to drink fluids, even tiny amounts at a time. One option is oral rehydration solution like Gastrolyte or Hydralyte, which you can get as liquid or ice blocks from your pharmacy.

If you’re concerned that your child is dehydrated, you should go straight to your GP or nearest emergency department.

Source: Raising Children

The post was flooded with comments from parents warning against kissing children on the face and lips.

‘I wish more people understood how serious this was and didn’t roll their eyes at new parents. You don’t need to kiss a baby!’ one mother commented.

‘It absolutely annoys me so much when people try to kiss my children without any consent. Someone kissed my baby when they had a cold sore after I said not to and I was terrified for weeks she was going to get sick,’ a second responded.

Others were sharing their similar experiences.

‘Our son was six weeks when he was kissed by someone with a cold sore and he got viral meningitis. He was on 24 hour antibiotics at the hospital for a week – it was the scariest thing for a new family and with him being so little,’ one mum wrote.

‘There’s a reason to be strict with this! we need to protect our bubbas!’ she continued.

‘My son had this and omg it is so horrible and painful, the bleeding and he couldn’t eat for 12 days was so so sick, he hasn’t had it back again and hopefully never does,’ another shared.

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