SNHD knew about restaurant’s possible cannabis contamination

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — 13 Investigates has discovered that health inspectors were alerted to a possible secret ingredient in some food at Secret of Siam: THC, the compound in marijuana that makes you high.

We now know when and why inspectors went to the restaurant in the first place.

If something was up at Secret of Siam in the past, we would have reported it on Dirty Dining. But the restaurant has only been open since 2019. It’s been inspected four times and has always gotten an “A” grade.

For the first time since news broke about people getting sick, we’re giving you a look inside Secret of Siam’s kitchen.

RELATED: How much THC is too much? A closer look after reports of tainted food at local restaurant

A customer complaint submitted to the Health District triggered a surprise inspection of the Centennial Hills restaurant on Feb. 10. That’s the day before multiple other customers complained about serious symptoms.

13 Investigates obtained a copy of the alleged complaint about “possible cannabis cross contamination with food eaten at Secret of Siam.”

The person in charge at the restaurant was not aware of the complaint. And the same employee told inspectors spices are kept in the kitchen and “no additional unusual additives are added to the dishes.”

The health inspector checked that out, writing, “I surveyed the spices in the food prep area and did not see any unusual spices or additives.”

The complaint was found to be “invalid/unsubstantiated.”

ORIGINAL STORY: Woman taken to ER after eating at Las Vegas restaurant under investigation for ‘adulterated’ food

But while there, the Health District conducted a routine inspection, resulting in a 3-demerit “A” grade. The only food violation was for an unlabeled container of bulk corn starch.

As 13 Action News has reported, the next day and through the weekend, customers complained about illness, some seeking medical attention. That prompted officials to close Secret of Siam as health officials and police continue to investigate.

If health inspectors knew there was a potential contamination issue, why did they let the place stay open?

13 Investigates is still waiting for a response from the Health District, but a food safety expert tells 13 Action News that health inspectors couldn’t see anything in the kitchen that would substantiate the complaint, and restaurant employees did not identify the menu item the customer ate.

Health inspectors do not have equipment to test for THC. Once the menu item is discovered, they’ll likely bring in the FDA to help test the food.

Join us Thursday morning on Good Morning Las Vegas at 6 am PT as we delve into the recent increase of hate toward Asian restaurants.

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